Case Presentation and Case Acceptance Myths

 

I want to discuss many of the myths and fallacies that float around the seminar circuit that is related to case presentation and case acceptance

 

  • The first of these myths is the Magic Word Theory
    • Based on the idea that doctors and big practices have clever lines to stop patients dead in their tracks and make them permanently change their health and financial priorities forever
      • Not true because patients progress one step at a time and towards higher health awareness  
    • May seem like it's working because of the big practice but there are no referrals  
    • The giant steps that patient's take in health maturity are almost always inspired by their own painful personal experience
    • There are some things that you can say to inspire and move your patient a step or two down the path but there is nothing you can say that by itself  will transform them 

 

  • The second myth - if you love them enough, you'll push them 
    • If you love people, you will push them until they comply with your recommendations 
    • This approach is not at all tolerated by patients  
      • As patients pay more and more out of their pocket for healthcare, they demand more efficiency and value, and less tolerant with being pushed
    • Leads to Dead Practice Syndrome 
      • Occurs when you take an unpopular stand with your patients and fail to sense your mistake until it's too late
        • When this happens, doctors have to restart their practice from scratch
      • Better in the long run to just tell the patient what they needed 
        • Then, asking the patient how they felt about it, leading the patient to feel more supported
          • Leads to keeping your practice and promoting the practice that you actually want 



  •  Third Myth - bundle your recommendations
    • Most patients do care about the costs and want to know how you stumbled upon the number that you presented them with
      • They are going to want you to tell them what treatment they need, why they need it, and how much it costs 
    • Bundling can qualify as step-skipping 
      • People need to be brought along at their own pace, step by step
        • Roofing/shingles story

 

  • Fourth Myth - relationship conquers all 
    • Some have said that developing a good relationship with your patients, leaves them helpless before you when you suggest a comprehensive approach
      • They talk about using the patient's name a certain amount of times, keeping notes that talk about patient's family life and hobbies
    • Won't hurt your case acceptance but don't be fooled into thinking this is a magic bullet 
      • Studies have shown that patients will leave their long-standing doctors, just to save $5 per visit
    • Scientific steps that can be taken in this area (Dr. Robert Cialdini):
      • Automatic Behavior - when this is triggered, a person responds in a predictable way without processing the information through normal channels
      • The 6 Weapons:
        • Reciprocation 
        • Authority
        • Liking 
        • Social Proof
        • Commitment and Consistency
        • Scarcity 

 

  • Fifth Myth - be prepared to overcome objections
    • You can't really overcome objections in healthcare, but that doesn't mean you can't accomplish the same thing 
      • Just needs to be done before you get to the case presentation phase
    • What is it that patient's say during case presentation that you would like to stop before it starts?
      • Start making a written list of the ways patients slip out of the office without making a decision, or by making the wrong decision 
        • Keep track of what happens the most 
    • If you feel like patient's are routinely outsmarting you in your case presentations, or if they don't seem mature enough to take responsibility for their own health, the problem is not them - it's you
      • The problem isn't case presentation; it's the diagnostic phase that's weak
        • During the examination, you failed to let the patient know that they really have a problem
      • By the time you reach case presentation, it's too late
        • By then, the patient is guarded because they're expecting to be sold at that time
        • It's during the diagnostic phase where you really get your only chance to communicate severity  

 

  • Myth Six - never let a patient leave without another appointment 
    • Not a treatment appointment but another appointment to discuss their case
    • Results in your clinic having a reputation as high-pressure and unethical
    • The Desperation Cycle: 
      • Stage 1 - the doctor who unknowingly runs patients off with a pushy style of case presentation, finds that before long, there are no referrals coming in 
      • Stage 2 - the doctor finds themselves naturally selling harder due to a lack of patients 
        • Results in a vacant clinic  
      • Stage 3 - doctors go out and advertise for new “victims” 
        • The goal is to find patients who haven't been warned about the clinic
    • Flight training story
      • You must learn to trust your staff as your instruments 

 

  • Seventh Myth - low price or high price holds hidden power  
    • If you have high prices, people will think you're good - not a winning strategy 
      • Validity should come first; then, higher prices 
    • Dead Zone - patients don't come in because of your prices 
      • Even though they don't consciously know that's what's keeping them out of your practice  

 

  • Myth Eight - patients have to be educated 
    • This complaint typically comes from doctors who have been step skipping 
    • Story about doctor who was getting 92 new patients a month - then down to 40 because of educating 
    • Essence of case acceptance wisdom:
      • Tell patients exactly what they need and then cheerfully give them exactly what they want
        • Write yourself a note that says the above 

 

Most of what we have covered has addressed failed mistakes that we make during case presentation 

Remember our assumption - money aside, most patients come to us  predisposed to say yes to whatever we recommend

Remember to be conscious - and not make any of the mistakes discussed so far - you're already well on your way to doubling your case acceptance